CELL PHONES
» Coming soon
» Top 15
» Best-rated
LAPTOPS
» Coming soon
» Top 15
» Best-rated
CAMERAS
» Coming soon
» Top 15
» Best-rated
» infoSync TV » Review Center
» CES 2009 » Expert guides
» RSS & Alerts » Ask The Editors
Home / Review Center / Cell phones / Business smartphones
Review: Palm Treo 750 business phoneBy Philip Berne, Monday 8 January 2007
GALLERY
Palm Treo 750
Enlarge
Palm Treo 750
Enlarge
Palm Treo 750
Enlarge
Palm Treo 750
Enlarge
Palm Treo 750
Enlarge
Palm Treo 750
Enlarge
Palm Treo 750
Enlarge
Palm Treo 750
Enlarge
 
 
Fresh from its European tour, the Palm Treo 750 brings UMTS-flavored worldwide 3G support, an antenna-less body, and Palm's custom Windows Mobile 5.2 enhancements.

Review summary of the Palm Treo 750:
Scoreboard »      Features »      Side-by-side »      Gallery »
Palm Treo 750 When we reviewed the Treo 700wx, we said the Treo was tethered to the fortunes of Windows Mobile, so it is no surprise that Palm has spent some time updating the Windows Mobile experience on the 750. As it stands, Palm's version of Windows Mobile is the best on the market by far, because it behaves more like the Palm OS, with its one-touch access to your favorite applications and helpful options, like the "Ignore with Text" option for incoming calls. The device itself is starting to show its age: its smaller keyboard and lower resolution screen place it more in the realm of thin smartphones such as the Motorola Q and Samsung BlackJack. From a design perspective, we've come to like the Cingular 8525's form more than the Palm, but the Palm is unbeatable in terms of what's inside. Release: January 2007. Price: $350.
Pros: Subtle improvements to design -- especially the lack of an external antenna -- are welcome. Voice commands and customized rings for free. Outlook is still the best for scheduling and e-mail on the phone.
Cons: Dearth of multimedia options. Lack of GPS. Poor PDF viewer. UMTS on the phone is much slower than on our tests with HSDPA and even EV-DO smartphones.
Poor
Mediocre
54%
GOOD
Very good
Excellent
Full Palm Treo 750 Review:
Design

Like the newly released Treo 680, the 750's main innovation in the design department is its lack of an antenna. The phone is almost an inch thinner and an ounce lighter than the Treo 700wx, although its still recognizably a Treo, and most cosmetic differences, such as moving the memory slot and IR port to the side of the phone, will only matter to Treo aficionados. The shell is curved a little more than on the Treo 700p, and the paint job is the soft-touch matte finish that has become popular on smartphones like the Samsung BlackJack and T-Mobile Dash. Anyone who totes around the older Treo 700p or 700wx will appreciate the lack of an antenna and the comfortable grip, but new smartphone users might wonder what all the hype is about.

Our favorite: We didn't know how much we hated the 700p's antenna until we sat down on the train with the antenna-free 750 in our pocket.

Our request: Put the IR port back on top; it's more fun beaming contacts by pointing our Treos directly at each other rather than holding them side-by-side.

Calling - Very good

Call quality on the Palm Treo devices has generally been excellent across the board, and the Treo 750 is no exception. What helps the Treo 750 break away from the pack are a couple of key additions since the 700wx. Through the Sounds and Notifications panel, the phone now supports MP3 and WMA ringtones, as well as video alerts, though no profiles support is available. The Voice Commands software in Windows Mobile 5.2 is accurate, capable of controlling not only our address book, but also our contacts, calendars and myriad other system functions. Both capabilities are available out of the box, whereas before these required a third-party purchase. Palm has also brought from its Palm OS side the ability to ignore a phone call and instead respond with an immediate SMS message. We got good reception in New York City, around three to four bars of UMTS service, though in New Jersey we lost UMTS entirely and got a solid four bars of EDGE. The phone also handles Bluetooth, including A2DP for stereo headsets. Conference calling should be easier; on the Treo 750 it requires a bit of menu drilling, and we found it difficult to manage. Conference calling on the Palm OS Treo 680, with its icon-based interface, was much easier. Battery life on the phone was good, with more than four hours of talking, but we tested our phone in Northern Jersey, outside of UMTS range, and Palm admits that talk time on the UMTS network will be shorter.

Our favorite: Voice commands that work accurately system-wide.

Our request: Profiles for ring settings and sound volume.

Messaging - Very good

The Treo 750 (along with Windows Mobile PPC in general) was built for e-mail. The phone handles push e-mail through Exchange and Good servers, as well as Lotus Domino. Outlook closely resembles its desktop counterpart, with live while-you-type searching in the "To:" fields of messages. SMS has been improved, at least by Windows Mobile standards, as Palm has (finally) added a threaded messaging app to handle SMS messages, so SMS conversations look more like Instant Messaging, a feature Palm OS users have been enjoying for a while. Instant Messaging is sparse, with only MSN on board, but plenty of third-party options should be available. Typing e-mails on the keypad was fine; though we found the keys a bit stiff, this could have been because the phone was so new. Our only complaint was that we had to download attachments after we had downloaded messages, and this second download sometimes took a couple of minutes for files larger than a megabyte.

Our favorite: Live, while-you-type searching of your address book everywhere you need it.

Our request: More Instant Messaging options, like Yahoo and AIM.

Scheduling - Very good

The calendar and agenda on the Treo 750 were little changed from the Treo 700wx, which was fine with us. The calendar showed plenty of information, more on the Treo's small screen (240x240) than we've seen on larger, QVGA phones. Individual appointments on the daily and weekly view got their own abbreviated titles, and the calendar's overall aesthetic was pleasingly colorful. The appointment editor had all the features we expect from Outlook, including Attendee notification that linked to our contact list, and drag and drop capabilities for changing appointment times. Synchronizing with our Exchange servers was mindless after the initial ActiveSync setup.

Productivity - Very good

Microsoft's Mobile Office is a clean, capable set of programs that strongly resemble their full versions, and Palm has left the programs unchanged since the Treo 700wx. We miss some features, like a lack of comments in Excel or any editing in PowerPoint, but if you must edit a word document on the road, Word Mobile is a reliable tool. PDF viewing is handled by Picsel, a program about which we normally rave, but we were stymied by the version we found on the Treo 750. There were no cues in the interface about navigating documents, and soft keys only accessed an anemic menu or an enigmatic "Hide Mode" command, which told you if you were in panning or zooming mode. We found no clues about how to switch between the modes, which would have been more useful, and no apparent soft keys for switching modes, or even turning pages. Overall, a disappointing effort from one of our favorite document viewers.

Our favorite: Documents in Office mobile reliably look like they would on the PC.

Our request: The Picsel viewer on the Samsung IP-830w set the standard for document viewers and should have been included here.

Laptop Sidekick - Very good

Once you have everything setup and working, the Treo 750 makes for a solid, though not quite enviable laptop sidekick. Setup was more difficult than it should be, requiring a walk through the Windows Network Connections Wizard, which is never fun. From there, Network Connections handles your Dial-Up Networking, instead of the friendlier Cingular Connection Manager (or the similar Sprint Connection Manager we used with the Treo 700wx). Download speeds were just under 400kbps, whether or not we were using our USB connection or our Bluetooth connection. Though much faster than regular dial-up (does anyone use dial-up anymore?), this pales in comparison to the megabit speeds we saw on Sprint's EV-DO network. Palm tells us that full HSDPA support is coming, and should be a free upgrade to the Treo 750, but would not give details about when this would happen. Regrettably, the phone does not charge over the USB cable, unlike the Treo 700, so you'll have to pack the extra charger.

Multimedia - Mediocre

Though none of the Windows Mobile Pocket PC phone's support Cingular Video service (the BlackJack does, but it runs Windows Mobile Smartphone), the lack of multimedia options on the Treo 750 is disappointing. The Treo 700p on Sprint runs Sprint's streaming TV service, and even MobiRadio or MobiTV would have been a nice addition. Instead, the phone lacks any dedicated service for streaming or downloadable multimedia content. Windows Media Player on the phone will sync with WMP 10 or higher on your desktop, but the experience is less than intuitive, and we found sync speeds to be sluggish, more than 20 minutes to fill a 512MB miniSD card. Also, though ActiveSync insists that you use an external memory card to synchronize your media files, the phone, by default, kept looking in its internal memory for our songs, and we had to instruct it to use the card, which is a three-step process through the menus. We do appreciate A2DP support, and found pairing the Palm Treo with our stereo headset to be painless. Internet Explorer was a fearless browser, tackling The New York Times homepage without errors or missed images, but layout tended to suffer, even on the "Desktop" view. Pages did load smoothly and quickly, under a minute for The New York Times, but scrolling long pages was a chore as the browser tended to jump from link to link instead of scrolling smoothly throughout.

Our favorite: A2DP support, but that's all this phone has going for it in terms of media

Our request: Everything: streaming video, music store, downloadable movies. Anything to take advantage of the UMTS (and eventually HSDPA).

Odds and ends Compared to Cingular's other Windows Mobile Pocket PC phone, the Cingular 8525, the Palm Treo 750 has a couple of omissions -- one we're fine with, and one we're not. We don't miss Wi-Fi because we're satisfied with 3G networking, and hopeful that HSDPA will come to the Treo 750 soon. Wi-Fi makes sense for T-Mobile, which lacks a 3G network, but we didn't use it much on the Cingular 8525. GPS, however, we use a great deal, and though phone navigation leaves something to be desired, it still beats using a paper map.


Price and availability

The Palm Treo 750 is available from AT&T Wireless for $350 with a contract agreement. A mail-in rebate of $150 is available, when signing up for a qualifying data and voice plan.

Best Business smartphones
Name Score Price Carrier
C
HTC Touch Pro (Sprint) 77% $400Sprint
HTC Fuze 77% $300AT&T
Sony Ericsson XPERIA X1 76% $800Unlocked
HTC Touch Diamond (Sprint) 76% $350Sprint
RIM BlackBerry Curve 8900 (T-Mobile) 75% $200T-Mobile
RIM BlackBerry Curve 8330 (Sprint) 74% $200Sprint
RIM BlackBerry Bold 9000 (AT&T) 74% $300AT&T
RIM BlackBerry Pearl 8130 (Verizon Wireless) 73% $170Verizon Wireless
Nokia E71 73% $500Unlocked
Nokia E66 72% $500Unlocked
Click here to see full and advanced chart »
 
 
 
RECOMMENDED
The Slab QWERTY Kings
 
Best All-touch Smartphones
 
The Ultimate QWERTY Sliders
 
TOP STORIES
Top 10 All-Touch Phones
 
Best Smartphones For Road Warriors
 
Top 15 smartphones of the week
10 Best Multimedia Cell Phones
 
Hottest new phones that are available now
 
Top 15 cell phones of the week
What are the Ultimate Geek Phones?
 
BlackBerry To The People
 
Best AT&T smartphones
Best Verizon Wireless cell phones
 
Best Sprint cell phones
 
Best AT&T cell phones
CELL PHONE RESOURCE CENTER
Best phones
 
Expert guides
 
Ask the Editors
» Top 15
QWERTY phones
 
All-touch phones
 
Rugged phones
Business phones
 
Multimedia phones
 
Concept phones
3+ inch screen phones
 
Wi-Fi phones
 
More...
» Search (New!)
Search by cell phone features
» Manual comparison (New!)
Select up to 4 cell phones side-by-side
» By release
January 2009, February 2009, March 2009, Q2 2009
» Top 15 by carrier
Unlocked, AT&T, Sprint, Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile, Helio, Alltel
» Top 15 by user type
Average Joe, Business users, Calling addicts, Fashion conscious users, Globetrotters, High-res addicts, Internet addicts, Multimedia enthusiasts, Music aficionados, Outdoor enthusiasts, TV addicts, Video lovers, More...
» Top 15 by brand
Apple, HTC, LG, Motorola, Nokia, BlackBerry, Samsung, Sony Ericsson Other
» Top 15 by platform
Palm OS, Symbian S60, Symbian UIQ, Windows Mobile
» Top 15 by cell phone type
Business smartphones, Multimedia smartphones
Consumer QWERTY phones, Multimedia phones
Concept phones
NOW IN PHONES
Motorola W233 Renew review (T-Mobile)
 
What We Expect from Apple iPhone 3.0
 
Nokia 7510 review (T-Mobile)
 
iPhone 3.0 software upgrade to be announced soon
 
Should RIM Worry About the Palm Pre?
Top 10 All-Touch Phones
Best Smartphones For Road Warriors
iPhone, Bold, Storm and Omnia are hot sellers, or?
Next 25 stories
MUST READ
CELL PHONES
» Coming soon
» Top 15
» Best-rated
LAPTOPS
» Coming soon
» Top 15
» Best-rated
CAMERAS
» Coming soon
» Top 15
» Best-rated
MP3 players
» Coming soon
» Top 15
» Best-rated
INTERNET TABLETS
» Coming soon
» Top 15
» Best-rated
GPS NAVIGATORS
» Coming soon
» Top 15
» Best-rated
HDTVs
» Coming soon
» Top 15
» Best-rated
CAMCORDERS
» Coming soon
» Top 15
» Best-rated
About us | Site map | How to advertise | Feedback | RSS Feeds | | Archive
Copyright 1999-2009 © infoSync World